What works in Relationship Education?

Lessons from Academics and Service Deliverers in the United States and Europe

 

Chapter descriptions

 

From the editors

Preface

Introduction

Background

Relationship education

Pre-relationship Education

Cohabitation and relationship education

Singles and other cultures

Challenges facing educators

Practical

Early interventions

Coping with stress

Screening distressed couples

Case study "The Marriage Course"

Policy

United States

Norway

Malta

 

chapter Downloads

 

From the editors

Callan

Benson

Background

Stanley & Rhoades

Rhoades & Stanley

Benson

Markman et al

Doss

Practical

Mansfield

Widmer & Bodenmann

Snyder et al

Lee & Lee

Policy

Coffin

Helskog

Abela

 

Referencing these chapters

Chapter 5

Adaptation

 

Howard Markman and colleagues present two interesting new topics in their paper. The first investigates the effectiveness of relationship education programmes amongst low-income communities where only one partner attends. The second explores the potential for use of the PREP relationship programme in particular within Muslim communities.

Markman’s study invited either one or both partners of low-income couples to attend a shortened version of PREP. Although 7% of women and 35% of men did not show up initially, very few of those that started the programme missed any subsequent sessions. Both singles and couples reported that they found the sessions useful, suggesting that individual attendance is helpful. Interestingly non-attending partners reported they found the course as helpful as their attending partners, suggesting a strong transfer effect. Both singles and couples reported reductions from pre- to post- in their negative communication. The transfer effect was especially strong where men attended the sessions. This preliminary finding supports the use of relationship education programmes where only one partner may be attending, for example in postnatal clinics or in prisons.

The authors conclude with a discussion of the potential applicability of the PREP model in Islamic communities, drawing on PREP’s strengths of a focus on education and mutual understanding and also delivery by local trainers who are familiar with their audience.